13 August 2014

reformation

Ever since I challenged myself to be more conscious of where my clothes come from I've been obsessively following Reformation. Their mission is "killer clothes that don't kill the environment" and they're clearly killing it. Using deadstock materials, vintage pieces as inspiration and created locally in New York and Los Angeles the brand is transparent and committed to sustainability. And it seems like every other day I see another celebrity or just a girl on the street wearing their pieces.
That's not to say it doesn't have its drawbacks. Based on a dress I bought and returned the clothes are definitely made with the tall and thin in mind. They did branch out and create a line for busty ladies, specifically styles with which a bra can be worn, but fit is an issue if you're petite or aren't boyishly shaped. It definitely shows a commitment to their customers that they listened to their requests though.
If you're reading, I'd love a petite line!
The clothes also come at a price: most dresses running well over $150, though not often exceeding $300. However, when you take into consideration how and where the garments are made the dollar amounts make sense and in my opinion are fair.
Regardless of whether or not you buy their clothes, they have a great marketing message that we should all keep in mind: respect the earth, its the only planet with pizza.
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via Reformation

5 comments

  1. Looks like they have a ton of gorgeous pieces! I would definitely have a problem with fit being 4'11" though! I didn't realize so many people actually threw out clothes. I always donate mine!

    Jamie | PetitePanoply.com

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  2. i love reformation!

    http://hanaljoofri.blogspot.se/

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  3. Ok, you sold me on this. I ordered two things haha! As a fellow petite gal let's hope they fit.

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  4. While I agree with the sentiment of donating unused stuff, it's more important to not buy so much new stuff in the first place. I manage a thrift store where we're force to get rid of at least a quarter of garments simply because we don't have room and there isn't the demand for all of it. Those things get thrown away or donated to people in third world countries and we still end up with leftovers! It's been eye opening working there. We simply consume too much.

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    1. I completely agree, I challenged myself this year to only buy things I really love or need. I work out a list each season of things that need to be replaced (underwear, socks, old white tees, running sneakers--things that can last a long time but eventually just have to go) and things I want. I whittle down the wants to 5 or less items and try to go for the highest quality from the most ethical place I can get it. I just want to create less waste and by buying less things of higher quality I can make them go a lot further.

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